Books about georgia o keeffe

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books about georgia o keeffe

Georgia OKeeffe: A Life by Roxana Robinson

This is a very important book to me. In 1995 I was going through a difficult time in my personal life and found that I was wallowing in self-consciousness and self-pity. I happened upon this biography during that time and found in Roxanna Robinsons depiction of Georgia OKeefe a new definition of a strong woman who knew from an early age who she was and lived up to her own personal ideals - even if she acted in a flawed way.

She was attracted to Alfred Stieglitz for his vision, his love of art and artists. He was attracted to her because he saw someone who was her own person and and American woman artist, at a time when European artists were the most revered. Stieglitz made it his mission to support, emotionally and financially American artists in order to bring their art to the world.

At first OKeefe became completely absorbed by Stieglitz, as many women do. He kept her in an apartment in New York, while he was married to another woman. He spent many hours of time photographing OKeefe in the nude, while supporting her so she could paint without a job getting in the way of the art. In that crucible of a relationship she was forced to look inward and the isolation, ironically, created a strong need to find out who she was - apart from Stieglitz, or any other man. She eventually learned that this vision - looking closely at a flower, or trying to draw/paint sound or the feeling of a headache for instance, and painting what she saw, was different - and people responded to it, viscerally.

Her life was a dramatic and often times funny journey of extremes.
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O'KEEFFE'S O'KEEFFES: The Artist's Collection

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This volume provides invaluable insight into the life and work of Georgia O'Keeffe. Editions: Hardback English. Fusing naturalism with abstraction, the intimate with the monumental and the corporeal with the cosmic, Georgia O'Keeffe — made the subject of nature wholly her own. The result is an insightful account of the art and life of this pioneering female artist. Griffin has taught numerous graduate seminars on American modernism and, for the last decade, a summer class on Georgia O'Keeffe in Taos, New Mexico. Tastefully simple, encased in a plastic cover to protect them from all those crayons and paints that you're sure to whip out in a frenzy of inspiration after browsing these pages. Each contains a trove of images of artwork and educational focus chapters on themes and techniques.

By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp. And her paintings, which are at once bold and hermetic, immediately appealing and unnervingly impassive, are very much a product of those years when American artists were buffeted by the conflicting pressures of an art-for-art's-sake individualism and an explosive populism. No wonder O'Keeffe so often provoked strong, often contradictory reactions. At midcentury, well after the press had enshrined her as an American original, the Abstract Expressionists rejected the spiritualized aestheticism that she shared with Alfred Stieglitz, the photographer who was her husband and her staunchest supporter. And near the end of her life, when O'Keeffe was presented as a feminist icon, another backlash ensued, for there were those who could not imagine that an artist who had been embraced as politically correct was a real artist after all. As Hunter Drohojowska-Philp makes clear in her biography, O'Keeffe was exceedingly sensitive to her shifting critical fortunes. Somewhere, deep down, she may have even understood that the size of her legend had little to do with the quality of her painting, and that in the end what she had achieved was something small and true, a slender thread in the weave of Western art.

When it comes to culture, Americans are like baby birds -- we like our nutrition pre-chewed. But there's always more gold in literary and cinematic tourism, so I didn't do cartwheels when I received a copy of Georgia, Dawn Tripp's "novel of Georgia O'Keeffe. O'Keeffe was the most famous female American artist of the last century and the most written about. And like anyone who'd taken an art history course, I'd seen dozens of the photographs that Alfred Stieglitz had taken of her and could write at least two paragraphs about vaginal imagery in her flower paintings. The good news: Georgia is a uniquely American chronicle -- told by O'Keeffe -- that starts with the importance of a good story and a killer bod. Does that sound uncannily like the techniques used to make careers for women a century later? Yes, and to degree that may shock purists, this is a book about branding and marketing, the first two commandments of success in the art world and our world.

Georgia O'Keeffe: Selected full-text books and articles

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