Work gender and family in victorian england

8.36  ·  4,419 ratings  ·  531 reviews
work gender and family in victorian england

Work, Gender, And Family In Victorian England by Karl Ittmann

At a time when historians are reaching for new approaches to understanding the hidden life of working-class European families, this study of family life and work explores some of social historys most pressing questions in a compelling and lucid way.
--Leslie Page MochUniversity of Michigan, Flint

As the industrial revolution swept through towns and villages, it radically altered traditional ways of life, dramatically transforming the family unit. The greater economic and social role of women, the changing relationship between parents and children, and the decline of masculine power all played a role in the perceived crisis of the family. Increases in crime, infanticide, abortion, poverty, and the use of birth control all heightened the concern about the destruction of the family.

By the late nineteenth century, communities throughout Europe and the United States witnessed a deliberate limitation of family size. This fall in family size resulted, Karl Ittman argues, not from newfound prosperity or the universality of Victorian values, but rather from the need for families to protect themselves from the uncertainties of modern life. This uncoupling of sexuality and reproduction sent shock waves through western societies that still resonate today. Many of these same issues have appeared in the contemporary American debate over family values.

Focusing on West Yorkshire, England, in the latter half of the 19th century, Ittman illuminates the many social, personal, and familial crises brought on by the industrial revolution.
File Name: work gender and family in victorian england.zip
Size: 35825 Kb
Published 29.12.2018

19th Century Women: Private and Public Spheres

Work, Gender and Family in Victorian England

In earlier centuries it had been usual for women to work alongside husbands and brothers in the family business. As the 19th century progressed men increasingly commuted to their place of work — the factory, shop or office. Wives, daughters and sisters were left at home all day to oversee the domestic duties that were increasingly carried out by servants. From the s, women started to adopt the crinoline, a huge bell-shaped skirt that made it virtually impossible to clean a grate or sweep the stairs without tumbling over. Women were considered physically weaker yet morally superior to men, which meant that they were best suited to the domestic sphere.

Stanford Bookstore : Centennial. Skip to search Skip to main content. Reporting from:. Your name. Your email.

Theodore Koditschek, Karl Ittmann. Work, Gender, and Family in Victorian England. Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in. To purchase short term access, please sign in to your Oxford Academic account above. Don't already have an Oxford Academic account? Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford.

David Levine, The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Toronto Work, Gender and Family in Victorian England examines the impact of the Industrial.
fire and ice book 7

About This Item

Work, Gender and Family in Victorian England. Karl Ittmann. Karl Ittmann's analysis of Bradford pushes forward our knowledge of the quiet revolution in social habits which took place in the late nineteenth century. In particular, his ability to link the decline of marital fertility with the reorganisation of work and gender roles is exemplary. This book should be of interest to all specialists in Victorian social history.

Here at Walmart. Your email address will never be sold or distributed to a third party for any reason. Due to the high volume of feedback, we are unable to respond to individual comments. Sorry, but we can't respond to individual comments. Recent searches Clear All.

By the late nineteenth century in most of Europe and the United States, the deliberate limitation of family size had become a general phenomenon. This fall in family size resulted, Karl Ittmann argues, not from newfound prosperity or the universality of "Victorian values," but rather from the need for families to protect themselves from the uncertainties of modern life. This uncoupling of sexuality and reproduction sent shock waves through western societies that still resonate today. Focusing on West Yorkshire, England, in the latter half of the nineteenth century, this book illuminates the many social, personal, and familial crises brought on by the industrial revolution. Through an intimate reading of the town of Bradford, center of the world's worsted trade in the heartland of the industrial revolution, Karl Ittmann recreates the web of material and social forces that shaped the decisions of working men and women about family life.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Narkis P. says:

    Work, gender, and family in Victorian England (Book, ) [inti-revista.org]

  2. Asbasuppre says:

    Kathryn Hughes explores the repressive and often contradictory expectations of women in middle class Victorian society, while examining how women such as Florence Nightingale and Elizabeth Barrett-Browning managed to challenge those expectations.

  3. Glycanenbe says:

    Work, Gender and Family in Victorian England - Karl Ittmann - Google книги

  4. Mike J. says:

    Gender roles in the 19th century - The British Library

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *