Mysticism ritual and religion in drone metal

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mysticism ritual and religion in drone metal

Owen Coggins (Author of Mysticism, Ritual and Religion in Drone Metal)

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Mysticism - Arcane Forest Rites (Full Album)

Coggins, Owen.
Owen Coggins

Mysticism, Ritual and Religion in Drone Metal

Please note that ebooks are subject to tax and the final price may vary depending on your country of residence. This is the first extensive scholarly study of drone metal music and its religious associations, drawing on five years of ethnographic participant observation from more than performances and 74 interviews, plus surveys, analyses of sound recordings, artwork, and extensive online discourse about music. Owen Coggins shows that while many drone metal listeners identify as non-religious, their ways of engaging with and talking about drone metal are richly informed by mysticism, ritual and religion. He explores why language relating to mysticism and spiritual experience is so prevalent in drone metal culture and in discussion of musical experiences and practices of the genre. The author develops the work of Michel de Certeau to provide an empirically grounded theory of mysticism in popular culture. He argues that the marginality of the genre culture, together with the extremely abstract sound produces a focus on the listeners' engagement with sound, and that this in turn creates a space for the open-ended exploration of religiosity in extreme states of bodily consciousness. List of figures Acknowledgements 1.

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Table of Contents

The genre, which includes bands such as Monarch! Performers frequently reference exoticized religious imagery and listeners sometimes use religious idioms to describe the visceral bodily experience of being vibrated by the hellacious volume. Early in the work, Coggins distinguishes his language-based approach to mysticism discourse within drone from that of much of previous academic scholarship on religion, music, and popular culture.

Owen Coggins. The full text of this book is only available to members of institutions that have purchased access. If you belong to such an institution, please login or read more about How to Order. This is the first extensive scholarly study of drone metal music and its religious associations, drawing on five years of ethnographic participant observation from more than performances and 74 interviews, plus surveys, analyses of sound recordings, artwork and extensive online discourse about music. Owen Coggins shows that while many drone metal listeners identify as non-religious, their ways of engaging with and talking about drone metal are richly informed by mysticism, ritual and religion.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Bobby R. says:

    This is the first extensive scholarly study of drone metal music and its religious associations, drawing on five years of ethnographic participant observation.

  2. Terencio R. says:

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