Bittersweet thoughts on change grace and learning the hard way

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bittersweet thoughts on change grace and learning the hard way

Bittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way by Shauna Niequist

“The idea of bittersweet is changing the way I live, unraveling and re-weaving the way I understand life. Bittersweet is the idea that in all things there is both something broken and something beautiful, that there is a moment of lightness on even the darkest of nights, a shadow of hope in every heartbreak, and that rejoicing is no less rich even when it contains a splinter of sadness. It’s the practice of believing that we really do need both the bitter and the sweet, and that a life of nothing but sweetness rots both your teeth and your soul. Bitter is what makes us strong, what forces us to push through, what helps us earn the lines on our faces and the calluses on our hands. Sweet is nice enough, but bittersweet is beautiful, nuanced, full of depth and complexity. Bittersweet is courageous, gutsy, audacious, earthy. This is what I’ve come to believe about change: it’s good, in the way that childbirth is good, and heartbreak is good, and failure is good. By that I mean that it’s incredibly painful, exponentially more so if you fight it, and also that it has the potential to open you up, to open life up, to deliver you right into the palm of God’s hand, which is where you wanted to be all long, except that you were too busy pushing and pulling your life into exactly what you thought it should be. I’ve learned the hard way that change is one of God’s greatest gifts, and most useful tools. Change can push us, pull us, rebuke and remake us. It can show us who we’ve become, in the worst ways, and also in the best ways. I’ve learned that it’s not something to run away from, as though we could, and that in many cases, change is a function of God’s graciousness, not life’s cruelty.” Niequist, a keen observer of life with a lyrical voice, writes with the characteristic warmth and honesty of a dear friend: always engaging, sometimes challenging, but always with a kind heart. You will find Bittersweet savory reading, indeed. “This is the work I’m doing now, and the work I invite you into: when life is sweet, say thank you, and celebrate. And when life is bitter, say thank you, and grow.”
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Virgil Scudder on Learning The Hard Way

Bittersweet: Thoughts On Change, Grace, And Learning The Hard Way

She is married to Aaron, and they have two wild and silly and darling boys, Henry and Mac. Shauna also writes for the Storyline Blog, and for IF:Table, she is a member of the Relevant podcast, and a guest teacher at her church. Not one thing in your life is more important than figuring out how to live in the face of unspoken pain. New York Times bestselling author of One Thousand Gifts Ann Voskamp sits at the edge of her life and all of her own unspoken brokenness and asks: What if you really want to live abundantly before it's too late? What do you do if you really want to know abundant wholeness? This one's for the lovers and the sufferers.

Crystal Rowe Jul 26, book reviews 1 comment 3 min read. Books I read, music I hear, conversations I have … they all keep coming back to one thing: storytelling. I was first introduced to this book sometime back in September by a friend of a friend. But somehow I kept coming across it over and over again, with an inner urging to pick it up and read it. So I finally did. And I was hooked from page one. Shauna uses every page to tell stories.

A few years ago, I found myself exhausted and isolated, my soul and body sick. I was tired of being tired, burned out on busy. And, it seemed almost everyone I talked with was in the same boat: longing for connection, meaning, depth, but settling for busy. I am a wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend, neighbor, writer, and I know all too well that settling feeling. This five-session, video-based Bible study offers an invitation to a new way of living—full of grace, space, and connection. In this daily devotional, Shauna Niequist becomes a friend across the pages, sharing her heart with yours, keeping you company, and inviting you into the abundant life God offers.

Author: Shauna Niequist.
poems about fear of rejection

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This site requires JavaScript. Please enable JavaScript before proceeding:. Internet Explorer. Out of stock online. Not available in stores. Bitter is what makes us strong, what forces us to push through, what helps us earn the lines on our faces and the calluses on our hands.

Have questions about eBooks? Check out our eBook FAQs. Bittersweet is the idea that in all things there is both something broken and something beautiful, that there is a moment of lightness on even the darkest of nights, a shadow of hope in every heartbreak, and that rejoicing is no less rich even when it contains a splinter of sadness. Bitter is what makes us strong, what forces us to push through, what helps us earn the lines on our faces and the calluses on our hands. Sweet is nice enough, but bittersweet is beautiful, nuanced, full of depth and complexity.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. Dexpesevan says:

    What is praise to god the book of mormon show reviews

  2. Laura M. says:

    Bittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way by Shauna Niequist

  3. Stauros H. says:

    Bittersweet is the idea that in all things there is both something broken and something beautiful, that there is a moment of lightness on even the darkest of nights, a shadow of hope in every heartbreak, and that rejoicing is no less rich even when it contains a splinter of sadness.

  4. Hardouin B. says:

    Bittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way [Shauna Niequist] on inti-revista.org *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. “The idea of.

  5. Beronike A. says:

    See a Problem?

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