Charlie and the chocolate factory story summary

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charlie and the chocolate factory story summary

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

Tonight I just finished reading Charlie and the Chocolate factory with my son. This is the first chapter book Ive read all the way through with him. And it was a ton of fun.

First off, Ill admit that I love the movie. I grew up with it. (Im talking about the Gene Wilder version, of course.)Ill even admit to liking the movie better than the book. Which is something that doesnt happen very often with me.

That said, the book is really, really good. It held my four-year olds attention. Its silly, and its fun.

And its DARK.

For those of you who havent read the book, let me underline this fact for you. Dahl takes pains to really detail the fact that Charlie and his family arent just hungry and poor. Theyre destitute. Charlie sleeps on a mattress on the floor. In the winter they are cold, and theyre starving to death.

And if you think Im exaggerating on that last point, Im not. One of the chapters is titled: The Family Begins to Starve.

But you know what? I like this book better because of that. Its not sanitized pablum written by committee to be inoffensive. Its the story of a little boy who is in a fucking awful situation, but he is still good and kind and polite and then something really nice happens to him.

Thats a trope I can get behind.

Its it a good book to read with your kids? Absolutely.

That said, allow me to tangent off and share my thoughts as a total bastard:

If Willie Wonka actually hired workers and paid them a living wage, maybe Charlie Bucket wouldnt be starving to death in the first place.

Follow me here. Wonka is effectively running a company where everyone is paid in scrip. The Oompa Loompas are paid, quite literally, in beans. Beans that Im guessing he has the Oompa Loompas themselves growing in some huge underground cavern.

Lets not even get into the ethical tarpit of the fact that Wonka uproots an entire indigenous culture and enslaves them. Lets just look at this from a raw numbers point of view. Pure economics.

The Oompa Loompas work in the factory. They are not paid. They never leave the factory. That means they dont pay rent. They dont buy groceries. They dont go to the movies, or take taxis ,or buy clothes.

But *everyone* buys Wonkas chocolate.

That means that money goes into the factory, but it doesnt come back out into the town.

As a result, the local economy is crap. And its because of this that Charlies dad cant get a decent job. Whats more, its because of this that his dad *loses* his shitty job, and his family is starving to death.

Willie Wonka isnt a childlike magic maker. Hes a billionaire corporate fuckwit. Hes the candy equivalent of Monsanto. Theres no government oversight there. Osha would never have approved that bullshit boiled sweet boat and chocolate river. No. Dude is untouchable.

And dont tell me he isnt. That shit that goes on with the other kids? Nobody even *thinks* of suing him. None of the parents even *hint* at it. He probably owns half the judges in the state, and a handful of senators, too.

Hes a fucking supervillian. And I would paid serious money to see a story where Batman kicks his ass.

*End Rant*

In closing, let me share something that Oot said while I was reading him this book:

Dad, Willie Wonka is just a regular human, but he *is* a little bit of a wizard like you.
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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - The Last Golden Ticket

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

It was perhaps the most popular of his irreverent, darkly comic novels written for young people and tells the story of a destitute young boy who wins a golden ticket to tour the mysterious and magical chocolate factory of Willy Wonka. Charlie Bucket lives on the outskirts of town with his poverty-stricken family: his parents and all four grandparents. Each day on his way to school, Charlie passes the best and biggest chocolate factory in the world, run by the secretive Willy Wonka. Later, the factory resumed production, but no one was ever seen entering or leaving. One day, Wonka announces that he has hidden golden tickets in five Wonka chocolate bars, with the prize of a tour of the factory and a lifetime supply of Wonka products for each child who finds a ticket. Wonka-mania encircles the globe, and one by one four of the tickets are found.

Plot Overview

Our story starts out with an introduction of the main characters: Charlie Bucket's family. Charlie, his parents, and his four grandparents all live together in a small house. They're poor, hungry, cold, and pretty much in dire straits.

Charlie Bucket is a young boy living in a tiny wooden house at the edge of a big city with his parents and four grandparents: Mr. Bucket , Mrs. The family is very poor, living only on what Mr. Bucket makes screwing toothpaste caps on at a toothpaste factory. They are constantly hungry, which is especially hard for Charlie, since they live down the street from an enormous chocolate factory and he loves chocolate more than anything else. Every night, Charlie listens to Grandpa Joe tell stories about Mr.

Willy Wonka, the eccentric owner of the greatest chocolate factory in the world, has decided to open the doors of his factory to five lucky children and their parents. In order to choose who will enter the factory, Mr. Wonka devises a plan to hide five golden tickets beneath the wrappers of his famous chocolate bars. The search for the five golden tickets is fast and furious. Augustus Gloop, a corpulent child whose only hobby is eating, unwraps the first ticket, for which his town throws him a parade. Veruca Salt, an insufferable brat, receives the next ticket from her father, who had employed his entire factory of peanut shellers to unwrap chocolate bars until they found a ticket. Violet Beauregarde discovers the third ticket while taking a break from setting a world record in gum chewing.

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