The happy depressive in pursuit of personal and political happiness

7.35  ·  7,865 ratings  ·  828 reviews
the happy depressive in pursuit of personal and political happiness

The Happy Depressive: In Pursuit of Personal and Political Happiness by Alastair Campbell

A thoughtful and insightful look at happiness and depression from a man who should know what hes talking about. Went to hear him speak and then bought this short book afterwards. It is a clear presentation of Mr Campbells philosophy about happiness and includes a refreshingly frank description of his own battles with depression. He makes some excellent points about the current well-being agenda and obviously has a clear vision about which areas policy makers should focus on. I hope he can find a role which allows him to put these excellent points into practice.
File Name: the happy depressive in pursuit of personal and political happiness.zip
Size: 36536 Kb
Published 13.01.2019

The Worst Things that Happen Can Often Be the Best - Alastair Campbell - [email protected]

Alastair Campbell: How I got happy and stayed grumpy

Are you happy? Does it matter? Increasingly, governments seem to think so. As the UK government conducts its first happiness survey, Alastair Campbell looks at happiness as a political as well as a personal issue; what it should mean to us, what it means to him. Taking in economic and political theories, he questions how happiness can survive in a grossly negative media culture, and how it could inform social policy.

Alastair Campbell. Paperback Leveringstid: Sendes innen 7 virkedager. Om boka. Avbryt Send e-post. Does it matter? Increasingly, governments seem to think so.

F riends have suggested that I am the least qualified person to talk about happiness, because I am often down, and sometimes profoundly depressed. But I think that's where my qualification comes from.
richard emerson rhythm and colour

Audio Editions

Are you happy? Does it matter? Increasingly, governments seem to think so. As the UK government conducts its first happiness survey, Alastair Campbell looks at happiness as a political as well as a personal issue; what it should mean to us, what it means to him. Taking in economic and political theories, he questions how happiness can survive in a grossly negative media culture, and how it could inform social policy. But happiness is also deeply personal. Campbell, who suffers from depression, looks in the mirror and finds a bittersweet reflection, a life divided between the bad and not-so-bad days, where the highest achievements in his professional life could leave him numb, and he can somehow look back on a catastrophic breakdown twenty-five years ago as the best thing that happened to him.

1 COMMENTS

  1. Backsteepsufib1957 says:

    Cancel anytime.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *