Far from a tree book

6.05  ·  6,960 ratings  ·  130 reviews
far from a tree book

Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon

Andrew Solomon’s startling proposition in Far from the Tree is that being exceptional is at the core of the human condition—that difference is what unites us. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Downs syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, or multiple severe disabilities; with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal, and Solomon documents triumphs of love over prejudice in every chapter.

All parenting turns on a crucial question: to what extent should parents accept their children for who they are, and to what extent they should help them become their best selves. Drawing on ten years of research and interviews with more than three hundred families, Solomon mines the eloquence of ordinary people facing extreme challenges.

Elegantly reported by a spectacularly original and compassionate thinker, Far from the Tree explores how people who love each other must struggle to accept each other—a theme in every family’s life.
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Published 02.02.2019

FAR FROM THE TREE Book Review *Non-Spoiler*

‘Far From the Tree,’ by Andrew Solomon

This book is wonderful - a word I've used to describe a couple of books I've read recently, so perhaps I won't seem terribly discriminating when I use it here. However, it's not often that I give a Important book about identity, challenge and disability. Each new chapter was engrossing and illuminating. I don't think I'll look at people who are "other", or their parents, in the same way, ever again. His TED talks have been viewed over ten million times.

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Editorial Reviews. inti-revista.org Review. Amazon Best Books of the Month, November From the National Book Award–winning author of The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression comes a monumental new work, a decade in the.
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Far From the Tree - 11.28.17

This is a passionate and affecting work that will shake up your preconceptions and leave you in a better place. And even though the book might have benefited from occasional tightening, it still makes for breathtaking reading — a vivid and gripping account of who we are right now, and what exactly happens when we try to make more of ourselves. Throughout, Solomon proves a calm and likable guide — open, curious, nonjudgmental, not too politically correct and also possessed of a sense of humor and honesty, which, you imagine, endeared him to his subjects. After all, as he explains here with bracing frankness, he too knows about the humiliations involved in the search for in his case, sexual identity. He knows what it is to feel like a freak. There is mystery here, as well as desperation. But there can be wry laughter and tenderness in the murkiness.

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Andrew Solomon tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children but also find profound meaning in doing so. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal. All parenting turns on a crucial question: to what extent parents should accept their children for who they are, and to what extent they should help them become their best selves. Whether considering prenatal screening for genetic disorders, cochlear implants for the deaf, or gender reassignment surgery for transgender people, Solomon narrates a universal struggle toward compassion and innumerable triumphs of love. Many families grow closer through caring for a challenging child; most discover supportive communities of others similarly affected; some are inspired to become advocates and activists, celebrating the very conditions they once feared. Elegantly reported by a spectacularly original thinker, Far from the Tree explores themes of generosity, acceptance, and tolerance—all rooted in the insight that love can transcend every prejudice.

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  2. Anton V. says:

    Far from the Tree | Andrew Solomon

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  5. Roreanovi says:

    Start by marking “Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity” as Want to Read: Andrew Solomon’s startling proposition in Far from the Tree is that being exceptional is at the core of the human condition—that difference is what unites us.

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