The kitchen house book club questions

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the kitchen house book club questions

The Next Best Book Club - Author/Reader Discussions: Glory Over Everything - Author/Reader Discussion Showing 1-50 of 66

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Christina Answers Top 10 Book Club Questions

Glory Over Everything by Kathleen Grissom is so much more than a book about slavery. It looks at this difficult time from a unique perspective; that of a man who is born to a white man and black woman, who is therefore considered of mixed blood and subject to the same lack of rights that black people are in that time period. Is this something that others found surprising, or am I just uneducated about this topic?

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom (Review by Erin Woodward)

Why did all the characters have to be either dastardly villains or faultless victims? It got wearisome. Was it necessary to have every conceivable tragedy happen? I swear, the author didn't miss a trick. Honest, I searched!

Sign up for our newsletters! It opens in , and Jamie, who is biracial but passes as white, has fled from Virginia where his parentage has been discovered and is living in Philadelphia society as a wealthy silversmith. This will take him near Tall Oakes and a ruthless slave hunter who has not forgotten him. Escape via the Underground Railroad weaves its way into the story, which is a complete page-turner. The writing is wonderful.

Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk. Done poorly, it paints a picture of a lifestyle now past.

Kathleen Grissom

Thanks for the review. Had seen this book mentioned somewhere else online and am def adding to my wishlist.

Kathleen Grissom, New York Times bestselling author of the highly anticipated Glory Over Everything , established herself as a remarkable new talent with The Kitchen House , now a contemporary classic. In this gripping novel, a dark secret threatens to expose the best and worst in everyone tied to the estate at a thriving plantation in Virginia in the decades before the Civil War. Lavinia learns to cook, clean, and serve food, while guided by the quiet strength and love of her new family. She attempts to straddle the worlds of the kitchen and big house, but her skin color will forever set her apart from Belle and the other slaves. Get a FREE e-book by joining our mailing list today! Plus, receive recommendations for your next Book Club read. By clicking 'Sign me up' I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the privacy policy and terms of use.

Rate this book. Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master's illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin. Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk. The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevail.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Dustin B. says:

    Our Reading Guide for The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom includes Book Club Discussion Questions, Book Reviews, Plot Summary-Synopsis and Author.

  2. Eduviges R. says:

    Q: What information surprised you while doing research on white indentured servants?

  3. Jenny V. says:

    The Kitchen House | inti-revista.org

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