Kyoichi tsuzuki tokyo a certain style

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kyoichi tsuzuki tokyo a certain style

Tokyo: A Certain Style by Kyoichi Tsuzuki

Ah, think of the serene gardens, tatami mats, Zen-inspired decor, sliding doors, and shoji screens of the typical Japanese home. Think again. Tokyo: A Certain Style, the mini-sized decor book with a difference, shows how, for those living in one of the worlds most expensive and densely packed metropolises, closet-sized apartments stacked to the ceiling with gadgetry and CDs are the norm. Photographer Kyoichi Tsuzuki rode his scooter all over Tokyo snapping shots of how urban Japanese really live. Hundreds of photographs reveal the real Tokyo style: microapartments, mini and modular everything, rooms filled to the rafters with electronics, piles of books and clothes, clans of remote controls, collections of sundry objects all crammed into a space where every inch counts. Tsuzuki introduces each tiny crash pad with a brief text about who lives there, from artists and students to professionals and couples with children. His captions to the hundreds of photographs capture the spirit and ingenuity required to live in such small quarters. This fascinating, voyeuristic look at modern life comes in a chunky, pocket-sized format-the perfect coffee table book for people with really small apartments.
File Name: kyoichi tsuzuki tokyo a certain style.zip
Size: 28258 Kb
Published 14.03.2019

Discover Tokyo

ISBN 13: 9780811824231

A tiny coffee-table book filled with pictures of people's apartments in Tokyo. Messy, cramped and full of riotously good-natured life, the rooms speak volumes about life in a city where space is obviously at a premium. Loved it! Makes me want to downsize in every way - smaller living space AND less stuff. Tokyo : A Certain Style. Kyoichi Tsuzuki. Ah, think of the serene gardens, tatami mats, Zen-inspired decor, sliding doors, and shoji screens of the typical Japanese home.

You love books, I love books. This works.

The brief biography sketches mention rock music critics, music critics, teachers, students at an elite art college, fashion models, NHK documentary cameramen, computer programmer American expats, mangaka, etc, so Tsuzuki clearly recruited by word of mouth and personal acquaintances so I must note that this is not remotely a representative population sample. Scanning my own books has saved me a great deal of space, and in many respects a scan is more useful. Fax machines are obsolete everywhere except Japan and can be thrown out. Modern flatscreen TVs take up much less space than the old CRT boxes and can be put on shelves because they are so thin, costing no usable space. Radios and boom boxes are obsoleted by smartphones, as are landlines and the giant chunky wireless phones and the answering machines and the grotesquely large 'word processor' I spotted in one room. Likely a number of photographic cameras took worse photographs than a random smartphone and could be replaced; there are a few video cameras which I'm not sure about.

A tiny coffee-table book filled with pictures of people's apartments in Tokyo. Messy, cramped and full of riotously good-natured life, the rooms speak volumes about life in a city where space is obviously at a premium. My folks and I got multiple copies of this little book back in when we were planning a family trip to Japan. Because the terrorist attacks, we never did end up taking the trip. This is still a Tokyo : A Certain Style.

Ah, think of the serene gardens, tatami mats, Zen-inspired decor, sliding doors, and shoji screens of the typical Japanese home. Think again. Tokyo: A Certain Style , the mini-sized decor book with a difference, shows how, for those living in one of the world s most expensive and densely packed metropolises, closet-sized apartments stacked to the ceiling with gadgetry and CDs are the norm. Photographer Kyoichi Tsuzuki rode his scooter all over Tokyo snapping shots of how urban Japanese really live. Hundreds of photographs reveal the real Tokyo style: microapartments, mini and modular everything, rooms filled to the rafters with electronics, piles of books and clothes, clans of remote controls, collections of sundry objets all crammed into a space where every inch counts. Tsuzuki introduces each tiny crash pad with a brief text about who lives there, from artists and students to professionals and couples with children. His entertaining captions to the hundreds of photographs capture the spirit and ingenuity required to live in such small quarters.

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