I seen or i saw

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i seen or i saw

Quote by Sarah Kay: “But I have seen the best of you and the worst o...”

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See Saw Seen - Irregular English Verbs

Saw is the PAST TENSE of the verb see, and usually comes immediately after NOUNS and PRONOUNS. Seen is the PAST PARTICIPLE of the VERB see. USAGE: saw: This word is a stand-alone VERB.

Have seen or saw?

A quick note before we begin, there are other meanings to these words, such as a cutting saw, but, today, we are only going to deal with the sense of visual eyesight. Saw is the past tense of the verb see. It forms the simple past, which is used to express an action that has started and finished at a specific time in the past. As you can see with all of these examples, the action that takes place is over and done with. I saw Star Wars yesterday. Seen is the past participle of the verb see , and it is used to form the perfect tenses: present perfect, past perfect, etc. I will explain everything below.

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You see, seen is the past participle form of to see , and we use the past participle when communicating in the present perfect tense, which refers to an unspecified point in time. The first example is in the simple past. Notice the difference in usage between the two examples? Its construction mirrors that of the simple past, but uses the present perfect form instead. Back to the first paragraph.

Saw is the past tense of the verb see. There is no need for a helping verb, which is important when comparing seen vs. saw. Seen is the past participle of the verb see, and it is used to form the perfect tenses: present perfect, past perfect, etc.
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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question. The first one is Past Tense. That means the action of the person seeing you started and ended before now, which is some specific time in the past.

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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. English Language Learners Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of other languages learning English. It only takes a minute to sign up. Sometimes they can mean the same thing, especially in US varieties of English. Sometimes we would use the first simple past when the consequences or result of the act of seeing are not particularly relevant to a current situation, and the second present perfect when such a connection is in operation. There are many other factors, some very nuanced and subtle, which may determine if we must or would tend to use one over the other. As with English grammar generally, the simple, more basic rules are worth learning, but we will best learn to make the correct choices more and more often by immersing ourselves in the language rather than trying to memorize myriad complex rules, and then retreive and use them while producing language--an impossible and endlessly frustrating undertaking.

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