Whats the difference between a sea lion and a seal

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whats the difference between a sea lion and a seal

Tell Me the Difference Between a Seal and a Sea Lion by Leigh Rockwood

Seals and sea lions are both sleek, fast swimmers and are known for forming large, noisy groups on land. At first glance, these animals look similar, but readers will enjoy exploring some of the ways to tell them apart. Full-color photographs highlight the concepts in the text and a comparison chart provides a handy visual tool for taking a closer look at how seals and sea lions measure up against one another. By the end of the book, readers will be experts on these furry, fun marine mammals.
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Published 13.10.2019

Seals and Sea Lions - BLUE WORLD ACADEMY

But seals and sea lions are in different taxonomical families owing to some key anatomical differences. The most notable anatomical differences are the ears.
Leigh Rockwood

The Difference Between Sea Lions and Seals

Are seals and sea lions the same animal? Technically, they are in the same taxonomical suborder of pinnipeds Pinnipedia , which comprises seals, sea lions, and walruses. But seals and sea lions are in different taxonomical families owing to some key anatomical differences. The most notable anatomical differences are the ears and the flippers. Also, sea lions are just plain noisy, whereas seals are a bit quieter. The pinniped suborder has 33 species in three families.

From whiskers to flippers and a penchant for fish, seals and sea lions have a lot in common. So how can you tell these pinnipeds apart? When sea lions swim, they propel themselves through the water using their front flippers. Seals, on the other hand, build speed with their rear flippers and by moving their lower body side-to-side in a sculling motion. Exactly how fast can seals and sea lions swim? Sea lions can reach speeds of mph!

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Seals and sea lions are right up there with otters and dolphins as some of the marine darlings that draw crowds of admiring fans to aquariums and beaches. But upon closer inspection, you may wonder which animal you're actually pointing and grinning at: a seal or a sea lion. Seals are closely related to sea lions and another semiaquatic mammal -- the walrus -- but there are some distinct differences. Walruses are easy to point out, but seals and sea lions can get a little confusing, especially because of the terminology used for the two. Sea lions are classified with fur seals , and the remaining seals with ears are known as true seals.

Sea lions left are brown, bark loudly, "walk" on land using their large flippers and have visible ear flaps. Seals have small flippers, wriggle on their bellies on land, and lack visible ear flaps. Have you ever wondered about the main differences between seals and their "second cousins," the sea lions? Both seals and sea lions, together with the walrus, are pinnipeds, which means "fin footed" in Latin. But seals' furry, generally stubby front feet — thinly webbed flippers, actually, with a claw on each small toe — seem petite in comparison to the mostly skin-covered, elongated fore flippers that sea lions possess. Secondly, sea lions have small flaps for outer ears. The "earless" or "true" seals lack external ears altogether.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Agnes V. says:

    Sea lions (left) are brown, bark loudly, "walk" on land using their large flippers and have visible ear flaps. Seals have small flippers, wriggle on their bellies on.

  2. Quintin O. says:

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