The dong with the luminous nose by john ashbery

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the dong with the luminous nose by john ashbery

The Cento: A Collection of Collage Poems by Theresa Malphrus Welford

As Gertrude Stein might have put it, a cento is a collage is a mix tape is a video montage.

This hypothetical description is fitting in a number of ways. Although the cento form is ancient—in existence since at least the days of Virgil and Homer—it was also used to striking effect in the Modern era: consider, for example, T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Ezra Pound’s Cantos.

More recent centos include John Ashbery’s “The Dong with the Luminous Nose,” Peter Gizzi’s “Ode: Salute to The New York School 1950-1970” (a libretto), Connie Hershey’s “Ecstatic Permutations,” and the “Split This Rock Poetry Festival—Cento, March 23, 2008” (a collaborative protest poem delivered in front of the White House).

The Cento: A Collection of Collage Poems, edited by Theresa Malphrus Welford and with an introduction by David Lehman, features an extensive sampling of centos, collage poems, and patchwork poems written by Nicole Andonov, Lorna Blake, Alex Cigale, Allan Douglass Coleman, Philip Dacey, Sharon Dolin, Annie Finch, Jack Foley, Kate Gale, Dana Gioia, Sam Gwynn, H. L. Hix, David Lehman, Eric Nelson, Catherine Tufariello, and many others.
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The Dong With The Luminous Nose

Cento: Poetic Form

Within a windowed niche of that high hall I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. I shall rush out as I am, and walk the street The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night. Come, Shepherd, and again renew the quest. And birds sit brooding in the snow. Continuous as the stars that shine, When all men were asleep the snow came flying Near where the dirty Thames does flow Through caverns measureless to man, Where thou shalt see the red-gilled fishes leap And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws Where the remote Bermudas ride. Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me: This is the cock that crowed in the morn. That beard of yours becomes you not!

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The Cento: A Collection of Collage Poems

From the Latin word for "patchwork," the cento or collage poem is a poetic form made up of lines from poems by other poets. Though poets often borrow lines from other writers and mix them in with their own, a true cento is composed entirely of lines from other sources. Early examples can be found in the work of Homer and Virgil. I trusted you. After great pain, a formal feeling comes— A vulturous boredom pinned me in this tree Day after day, I become of less use to myself, The hours after you are gone are so leaden.

Within a windowed niche of that high hall I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. I shall rush out as I am, and walk the street The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night. Come, Shepherd, and again renew the quest. And birds sit brooding in the snow. Continuous as the stars that shine, When all men were asleep the snow came flying Near where the dirty Thames does flow Through caverns measureless to man, Where thou shalt see the red-gilled fishes leap And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws Where the remote Bermudas ride. Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me: This is the cock that crowed in the morn. Who'll be the parson?

The Plot Against the Giant. You can read the first chapter of "the last avant-garde" in Jacket 5. Influenced by French poetry and therefore by what Ashbery has called the "Other Tradition," these poets are innovative yet respectful of traditional form. They are fond of wild juxtapositions and changes of tone but also of lyrical beauty of expression. In style and attitude, they have the "dash" of Byron rather than the sincerity of Wordsworth. Their work ranges from the postmodern discontinuity of Ashbery's The Tennis Court Oath to the romantic formalism of Kenneth Koch's comic epic in ottava rima, The Duplications. They are also attracted to the compositional methods of the French group Oulipo, of which Harry Mathews, a founding editor of the New York School journal, Locus Solus , is an active member.

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  4. Lori L. says:

    The Dong With The Luminous Nose Poem by John Ashbery - Poem Hunter

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