Gilgamesh text with line numbers

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gilgamesh text with line numbers

The Epic of Gilgamesh by Anonymous

Andrew Georges masterly new translation (The Times) of the worlds first truly great work of literature

Miraculously preserved on clay tablets dating back as much as four thousand years, the poem of Gilgamesh, king of Uruk, is the world’s oldest epic, predating Homer by many centuries. The story tells of Gilgamesh’s adventures with the wild man Enkidu, and of his arduous journey to the ends of the earth in quest of the Babylonian Noah and the secret of immortality. Alongside its themes of family, friendship and the duties of kings, the Epic of Gilgamesh is, above all, about mankind’s eternal struggle with the fear of death.

The Babylonian version has been known for over a century, but linguists are still deciphering new fragments in Akkadian and Sumerian. Andrew George’s gripping translation brilliantly combines these into a fluent narrative and will long rank as the definitive English Gilgamesh.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
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Published 25.10.2019

Line numbering in Notepad

The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the oldest stories, not just in the setting of the narrative but also in the fact that there are tablets of this story that reach back to the times of Abraham.
Anonymous

THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH [Text, Translation, & Tablets]

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An Assyriologist at the University of London UCL has discovered that a stolen clay tablet inscribed with ancient cuneiform text that was recently acquired by a museum in Iraq, contains 20 previously unknown lines to the epic story of Gilgamesh, the oldest known epic poem and widely regarded as the first great work of literature ever created. The discovery provides new details about Gilgamesh, king of Uruk, and Enkidu, a wild man created by the gods to rid Gilgamesh of his arrogance, as they travel to the Cedar Forest, home of the gods, to defeat the monstrous giant Humbaba. Live Science reports that the tablet, which measures 11 cm x 9. While such a move is controversial, in that it feeds the black market in antiquities dealing, the museum argues that it is the only way to regain some of the valuable artifacts that have been looted from historical sites in Iraq. While the exact provenance of the tablet is unknown, the style of script and the circumstances of acquisition, lead experts to believe it was unearthed at a Babylonian site, and may date back ask far as the Old Babylonian period — BC.

the translation where the line-count in the margin seems to disagree with the numbers of lines of text.) In Gilgamesh the verse is the only poetic unit explicitly.
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44 minutes

Tablet I He who has seen everything, I will make known? I will teach? He saw the Secret, discovered the Hidden, he brought information of the time before the Flood. He went on a distant journey, pushing himself to exhaustion, but then was brought to peace. He carved on a stone stela all of his toils, and built the wall of Uruk-Haven, the wall of the sacred Eanna Temple, the holy sanctuary. Look at its wall which gleams like copper? Take hold of the threshold stone--it dates from ancient times!

2 COMMENTS

  1. Aimée M. says:

    Tablets : Epic of Gilgamesh

  2. Kisses215 says:

    Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet.

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